Health Benefits Of Parsnips {In Season Fall Veggie!}

Health Benefits of Parsnips, Fall, vegetables,

Health Benefits Of Parsnips {In Season Fall Veggie!}

Another fall favorite veggie on the blog this month! You’ll be seeing parsnips around the grocery store soon enough! These look identical to carrots…they actually look like white carrots. I’ve tried mashed parsnips before + from my experience, they have a little bit of a stronger root-y flavor comparing to carrots, but the health benefits are still super awesome!

Parsnip Nutrition

  • Vitamin C
  • Potassium
  • Fiber
  • Folate
  • Phosphorus
  • Magnesium
  • Manganese

Parsnips can boost your immune system to fight off the fall colds + flus. Since parsnips have a good amount of fiber, this veggie can really help things stay consistent down there….if you know what I mean. ? Not only does fiber keep your bowels regular by preventing constipation, but it also helps reduce the risk of hormones being reabsorbed into the body and causing an imbalance. Most of our estrogen is flushed out by our bowels, if we are constipated and not releasing the bowels, this can cause hormonal disruption. Fiber also helps feed your good gut bacteria. Those guys need some food too!

Parsnips are a great source of folate, which is needed for a healthy pregnancy + baby. Folate is also necessary for DNA/RNA synthesis, conversion of homocysteine to methionine. If homocysteine levels are built up, this dramatically increases the risk of heart disease.

Manganese is the cofactor of many enzymes in the body – everything from synthesis of collagen, protein, fats, and plays a big role in bone growth. Manganese regulates the osteoblasts + osteoclasts in bone growth.

How To Use Parsnips

Parsnips are pretty versatile to what you can use it for. You can roast them, bake them, sautée them. I’ve personally made mashed parsnips, which are pretty good with grass-fed butter. It does have a stronger root-y flavor compared to many other root vegetables I’ve tasted. Many people make dishes that combine both parsnips and carrots, since they are in the same vegetable family.

Since parsnips are a starchy vegetable, you can also use them in soups and I’ve even seen recipes that made a parsnip pizza crust! WHAAAT?! Never tried that, but sounds interesting. Go on Pinterest + start getting parsnips more in your diet this fall. ‘Tis the season!

Lahana Vigliano
lahana@thrivalnutrition.com

Lahana Vigliano is a Certified Clinical Nutritionist and CEO of Thrival Nutrition. She has her Bachelor's Degree in Nutrition Science and currently pursing her Masters Degree in Nutrition Science and Functional Medicine. Lahana and her team help support women who struggle with weight loss, hormonal imbalances, digestive issues, chronic fatigue, and many other lingering issues that leaves women not feeling their best. She uses food as medicine, as well as herbs and supplements when needed, to support her clients. She looks at the whole body holistically making sure women are understanding how nutrition, sleep, stress, and their environment impact their health. Connect with her on Facebook + Instagram (@thrivalnutrition).